Elephanatics

Just Released: Routledge Handbook of Rewilding

At the start of the UN #Biodiversity #COP15 taking place in Montreal from Dec 7-16, we are very excited to announce the launch of the Routledge Handbook of Rewilding!
The Handbook is edited by founding members (including Rene Beyers of Elephanatics) of the #IUCN Rewilding Thematic Group and written by more than 60 distinguished experts offering a large diversity of experiences and perspectives.
The book is an invaluable resource for conservation students, academics, rewilding practitioners, policy makers and anyone interested in the restoration of degraded ecosystems. Conservation practitioners who want to integrate rewilding principles into their conservation programs will also highly benefit from this book.
#Rewilding is a fascinating and rapidly emerging field with the goal of helping degraded ecosystems recover and become healthy, resilient, persistent and self-sustaining systems with no or minimal human interference. Rewilding also offers a transformational paradigm shift in the way we think about our relationship with nature. The four sections in the book give a comprehensive overview of key areas of rewilding including: the history of rewilding, ecological theory and practice, rewilding ethics and philosophy. The book gives a global perspective, drawing on case studies from across the world.
Buy yours today at: https://bit.ly/3uyB2ww

Summary of CITES COP19 Nov 14- 25

Summary of Proposal Outcomes at CITES CoP19 November 14 – 25th 2022

The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), CoP19, concluded this past Friday, November 25th. Elephanatics and coalition partners wrote a letter to Canadian MP’s and Canadian CITES Scientific Authority calling for urgent action to be taken to provide elephants the highest level of protection. Below is a summary from the proposals we opposed and supported from the letter we sent.

We opposed:

a.) The proposal to CITES by Zimbabwe at the upcoming convention to amend Annotation 2 pertaining to the populations of Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe as specified here:

https://cites.org/sites/default/files/documents/E-CoP19-Prop-04_1.pdf

  • Loxodonta africana:ZIMBABWE introduced CoP19 Prop.4 to amend the annotation for the Appendix II listing of elephant populations ( africana) in Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. BENIN, LIBERIA, BURKINA FASO, PANAMA, KENYA, the EU, GABON, the UK, and ETHIOPIA opposed the proposal on the grounds that it would reopen international trade in ivory. DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO, ESWATINI, ZAMBIA, TANZANIA, NAMIBIA, BOTSWANA, and LESOTHO supported the proposal, highlighting the relative stability of Southern African elephant populations. IUCN stressed the endangered status of the African savannah elephant.

** The proposal was rejected, with 15 in favour, 83 opposed, and 17 abstentions. Canada voted to reject proposal.

b.) The proposal by Namibia and Botswana to transfer Namibia’s population of southern white rhinos from Appendix I to Appendix II to facilitate trophy hunting and live animal trade for in-situ conservation purposes, as specified here:

https://cites.org/sites/default/files/eng/cop/19/prop/as_received/E-Ceratotherium_simum_simum-Namibia.pdf

  • The proposal to downgrade the status of southern white rhino from Appendix I to Appendix II was accepted at the 19th Conference of Parties (COP19). The amendment restricted the downgrading to live animals, for in situ conservation purposes only. The initial proposal also sought the export of hunting trophies. The decision does not reopen the international trade in rhino horn.

** The proposal was confirmed after it received 83 votes in favour, 31 against it and 13 abstentions. Canada voted in favour. 

We supported:

The proposal by Burkina Faso, Equatorial Guinea, Mali, and Senegal to transfer African Elephant populations in Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe from Appendix ll to Appendix l.

https://cites.org/sites/default/files/eng/cop/19/prop/as_received/E-Loxodonta_africana-Transfer_App_I.pdf

  • L. africana: BURKINA FASO introduced CoP19 Prop.5 to include all populations of African elephants (L. africana) in Appendix I through the transfer from Appendix II to Appendix I of the populations of Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe. BENIN, TOGO, KENYA, NIGER, SENEGAL, PANAMA, NIGERIA, and BURUNDI supported the proposal, calling for the single listing of all African elephants in Appendix I. CONGO, BOTSWANA, the EU, TANZANIA, ESWATINI, ZIMBABWE, JAPAN, RWANDA, ZAMBIA, NAMIBIA, INDONESIA, ERITREA, UGANDA, and MALAWI opposed the proposal.

The US highlighted Committee II discussions exploring the establishment of a fund accessible to range states upon the non-commercial disposal of their ivory stockpiles.

** The proposal was rejected, with 44 in favour, 59 opposed, and 13 abstentions. Canada voted to reject proposal.

Other good news for Elephants and Rhinos

  • A three-year moratorium was placed on trading live African elephants – meaning there will be no more capturing of baby African elephants from the wild and shipping them to captivity overseas at least until a decision is taken through the standing committee which could take some years. So this is good news for now!
  • There will be no rhino horn trade!
  • A 2nd reading of Henry Smith’s Private Member’s Bill, Hunting Trophies (Import Prohibition) Bill passed. His bill would ban British hunters from bringing ‘trophies’ of endangered and vulnerable animals into Britain. The Bill needs to successfully go through all the UK parliamentary stages and then Royal Accent before it becomes law.

Overall, there were some good outcomes for elephants and rhinos. Many other endangered species received more protection such as birds, amphibians, turtles, glass frogs, snakes, lizards, some of which are traded heavily for the pet trade.

More work needs to be done with African and Asian communities to deal with human wildlife conflict and the role of CITES in reducing risk of future zoonotic diseases associated with international wildlife trade.

For the full summary records at CoP19 see here.

 

 

 

Volunteers In Action For Elephants!

We were fortunate to have two grade 10 students from #FleetwoodParkSecondary School deliver Elephanatics biodiversity presentation to their fellow math classmates!
We thank Rasudev and Clement for doing a great job at bringing awareness to the critical role elephants play in supporting their ecological habitats, biodiversity, and climate change.
Considering they presented to students in a math class they came up with an equation to calculate the weight of an elephant.
“The equation to calculate the weight of an Indian elephant: Weight= -1010+ 0.036 (LxG), where G is the chest girth and L is the body length.”
The elephants trumpet in thanks to you both!

Giving Tuesday November 29th


It’s Giving Tuesday November 29th

This #GivingTuesday we are asking you to help support the work of Elephanatics to build conservation educational capacity in Kenya by donating to the Fran Duthie African Elephant Conservation Scholarship held with Mara Elephant Project, an African conservation organization in Kenya dedicated to protecting elephants and their habitats.

The scholarship provides financial support to Kenyan nationals acquiring a technical certificate, undergraduate or postgraduate (Masters or PhD) degree in an area related to conservation and the protection of wildlife.

Janeth Jepkemboi was the first ever recipient of the scholarship.

Janeth began her master’s program at Karatina University studying environmental science. Janeth’s parents worked hard to put her through high school, and she helped by doing fundraisers. To pursue her undergraduate degree, she took out loans and worked throughout. Janeth was an exceptional candidate for this scholarship.

“My undergraduate studies in environmental studies made me passionate about conservation and I love connecting with nature. This scholarship is an opportunity for me to gain skills and academic excellence that I will use after as I envision working with a conservation organization and being at a level where I can influence policy to safeguard livelihoods while still protecting biodiversity values. This scholarship will be a great opportunity to realize my dreams and be an asset to the community.”

Janeth’s first semester consists of 7 units to include Conservation & Planning of Biological Resources, Environment & Development, among others. She is currently working on numerous assignments and term papers and will be writing her end of semester exams in January. We wish her every success and know she will do well.

The future of our wildlife depends on students, such as Janeth, to bring innovative change to conservation methods and modalities. We are all interdependent on nature for our own survival. Please consider investing in students who will provide the expertise necessary to make these changes.

 Donate Here

* Please state in the comments section under ‘Donate Now’ that you would like your money deposited to the “Fran Duthie Scholarship”.

 

 

 

GMFER AND PARTNERS AT #CITES COP19

GMFER AND PARTNERS AT #CITES COP19

14-24 November 2022. Panama City, Panama

CITES-CoP19 and its member nations must guarantee regulation ensuring the protection of Earth’s last wild inhabitants. Failure to fortify the interface between human activities and the lives of wild animals and plants will set the stage for future pandemics, economic failure, extinction events, and ecological collapse.

Even as economic considerations are factored, nature must be valued over money. #NatureNotMoney. We respectfully call on CITES’ member nations to support the following at CoP19:

  1. List all African elephants on Appendix I. Specifically:
    Support the proposal by Burkina Faso, Equatorial Guinea, Mali, and Senegal to transfer African Elephant populations in Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe from Appendix II to Appendix I.

    Oppose Zimbabwe’s proposal concerning elephant populations of Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe.

  2. Close all loopholes in Appendix I and Appendix II permitting the live capture and trade of elephants.
  3. Maintain the international ban on rhino horn trade. Specifically:

    Oppose the proposal by Namibia and Botswana to transfer Namibia’s population of southern white rhinos from Appendix I to Appendix II to facilitate trophy hunting and live animal trade for in-situ conservation purposes.

  4. Move Oophaga vicentei to CITES Appendix I.
  5. Prohibit the import and export of trophies.
  6. Regulate the trade of Traditional Medicines using the body parts of IUCN red-listed animals.
  7. Implement and enforce an e-permit registration system in all participating member-nations.

 

Holiday Shopping Made Easy!

It’s that time of year again to start ordering early for holiday cheer!
Check out with our promo ‘SAVE10’
100% of net profit supports Elephanatics in their ongoing efforts to ensure the long-term survival of global elephant populations through conservation, education, and action.
Lots of item selection – order here:

CITES CoP19 Letter to MP’s

October 15, 2022

Dear Member of Parliament,

We are a coalition of organizations calling for urgent action to be taken at the upcoming CITES-CoP19 taking place in Panama City, Panama, November 14-25. (https://cites.org/eng/cop19).

We oppose:

a.) The proposal to CITES by Zimbabwe at the upcoming convention to amend Annotation 2 pertaining to the populations of Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe as specified here: https://cites.org/sites/default/files/documents/E-CoP19-Prop-04_1.pdf

b.) The proposal by Namibia and Botswana to transfer Namibia’s population of southern white rhinos from Appendix I to Appendix II to facilitate trophy hunting and live animal trade for in-situ conservation purposes, as specified here: https://cites.org/sites/default/files/eng/cop/19/prop/as_received/E-Ceratotherium_simum_simum-Namibia.pdf

We support:

The proposal by Burkina Faso, Equatorial Guinea, Mali, and Senegal to transfer African Elephant populations in Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe from Appendix ll to Appendix l.1

https://cites.org/sites/default/files/eng/cop/19/prop/as_received/E-Loxodonta_africana-Transfer_App_I.pdf

Read full letter here: Dear Member of Parliament

African Elephant Conservation Scholarship distributed by Mara Elephant Project!

We are very pleased to announce: Janeth Jepkemboi as the first ever recipient of the Fran Duthie African Elephant Conservation Scholarship distributed by Mara Elephant Project!

We are excited to announce that Janeth Jepkemboi is the first ever recipient of the Fran Duthie African Elephant Conservation Scholarship distributed by Mara Elephant Project. Janeth is beginning her master’s program at Karatina University studying environmental science. Janeth’s parents worked hard to put her through high school, and she helped by doing fundraisers. To pursue her undergraduate degree, she took out loans and worked throughout. Janeth was an exceptional candidate for this scholarship generously supported by Fran Duthie and her family.

“My undergraduate studies in environmental studies made me passionate about conservation and I love connecting with nature. This scholarship is an opportunity for me to gain skills and academic excellence that I will use after as I envision working with a conservation organization and being at a level where I can influence policy to safeguard livelihoods while still protecting biodiversity values. This scholarship will be a great opportunity to realize my dreams and be an asset to the community.”

TAKE ACTION

TAKE ACTION – The Future of Elephants and Rhinos Depends On Us!

The Canadian government has committed to do its part in helping save these iconic and majestic animals by ending the elephant ivory and rhino horn trade in Canada. But time is running out and extinction is not an option.

Please urge the Government of Canada to fulfill its mandate to end the elephant ivory and rhino horn trade in Canada:

1.) sign letter https://bit.ly/38pmlSn

2.) petition change.org/IvoryFreeCanada

For an #IvoryFreeCanada

Thank You For Your Donations To SEEDBALLS Kenya Fundraiser!

A Big Thank You to all who donated to our fundraiser for SeedballsKenya!
It was a wonderful success!
We have donated 5 x 25kg bags of seedballs to be delivered to Mara Elephant Project
Let the new growth begin!