Elephanatics

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – Call for Ban on Elephant Ivory Trade in Canada

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

More than 40 NGOs call for ban on elephant ivory trade in Canada to help save African elephants

Tens of thousands of concerned Canadians and international stakeholders participated in public consultation on possible trade prohibitions

MONTREAL (Sept. 27, 2021) – As the Canadian government’s public consultation on elephant ivory trade comes to an end, Humane Society International/Canada, Elephanatics, and more than 40 Canadian and international NGOs, together representing tens of millions of supporters globally, have signed on to a letter calling on the new Canadian government to take urgent action to prohibit elephant ivory trade.

Environment and Climate Change Canada launched the public consultation to hear feedback on proposed measures to restrict or end elephant ivory trade on July 23, 2021. During the 60-day consultation period, Canadians and individuals around the world voiced their support for ending Canada’s role in the elephant ivory trade.

Kelly Butler, the wildlife campaign manager for Humane Society International/Canada, stated:

“Canadians have made it clear that there is no place for elephant ivory trade in Canada. We are now calling on the newly elected Canadian government to listen to the overwhelming number of Canadians and international stakeholders who supported strict elephant ivory trade prohibitions and implement these measures urgently. Elephants do not have another four years to wait.”

Tessa Vanderkop, vice-president of Elephanatics, stated:

“The African elephant population has declined by a staggering 96% in the last century alone and the species is at risk of going extinct in the wild within the next few decades without global intervention. The United Nations Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) and leading conservation organizations including the African Elephant Coalition have called for countries to close their legal elephant ivory markets in order to curtail poaching and save African elephants from extinction. Experts around the world agree that it’s beyond due time for Canada to close its elephant ivory market.”

The NGO-led sign-on letter calls on the Canadian government to implement the strictest measures that were proposed in the consultation, including prohibitions on importing elephant ivory for commercial purposes or as hunting trophies and is signed by:

African Conservation Foundation, Animal Defenders International, Animal Justice, Animals Asia Foundation, BC SPCA, Big Life Foundation Canada, Born Free Foundation, Bring The Elephant Home, Canopy, CATCA Environmental and Wildlife Society (CEWS), Earth League International (ELI), Elephanatics, Elephant Listening Project, Elephant Reintegration Trust, Family and Animal Wellness Inc, Fondation Franz Weber, For the Love of Wildlife Ltd, Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Global March for Elephants and Rhinos, Humane Canada™, IFAW Canada, Insure Our Future, International Animal Rescue, Mara Elephant Project, Member of this planet, National Council of Societies for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. New Zealanders for Endangered Wildlife founder, No Whales In Captivity, NRDC, Nsefu Wildlife Conservation Foundation, NSPCA, Pan African Sanctuary Alliance, Performing Animal Welfare Society (PAWS), Pro Wildlife, Rhino & Elephant Defenders (RED), Save Elephant Foundation, SEEJ-AFRICA (Saving Elephants through Education and Justice), Shark Research Institute, Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, Species Survival Network, Standfast Developments Ltd, The Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee, Two Million Tusks, WildlifeDirect, World Animal Protection Canada, World Animal Protection International, World Elephant Day, and Zoocheck Inc.

Quick Facts:

· Every year, as many as 35,000 elephants die at the hands of elephant ivory poachers in Africa.

· In March of 2021, the International Union for Conservation of Nature updated the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and declared the African forest elephant to be Critically Endangered and the African savanna elephant to be Endangered.

· Canada’s top trading partners, including the United States, China and the United Kingdom have closed their elephant ivory markets in response to declining elephant populations.

· In addition to elephant ivory trade, Canada allows the import of elephant tusks and parts from trophy hunts. Approximately 300 African elephant tusks – representing 150 elephants – were legally imported into Canada from 2010-2018.

· Repeated government seizures of elephant ivory in Canada are irrefutable evidence of illegal ivory trade in this nation. While such seizures may intercept some of the illegal trade that is occurring, it is conservatively assumed that customs intercepts just 10% of all contraband ivory.

· In June, an open letter calling for an end to elephant ivory trade in Canada was signed by notable Canadians including David Suzuki, Robert Bateman and Bryan Adams.

· According to a 2020 poll by Insights West, 94% of Canadians support an elephant ivory trade ban. A public petition calling for a Canadian ban on elephant ivory trade has amassed over 600,000 signatures.

 

For interview requests, please call or email media contact below.

Media Contact: Michael Bernard, deputy director, HSI/Canada, cell: 613-371-5170 email: mbernard@hsi.org.

Humane Society International/Canada is a leading force for animal protection, with active programs in companion animals, wildlife and habitat protection, marine mammal preservation, farm animal welfare and animals in research. HSI/Canada is proud to be a part of Humane Society International which, together with its partners, constitutes one of the world’s largest animal protection organizations. Celebrating animals and confronting cruelty worldwide – on the Web at http://www.hsicanada.ca

Paul Rodgers Stands Up For Elephants!

Elephanatics is so very fortunate to have Paul Rodgers support the Canadian consultation launched to gather feedback on appropriate measures to restrict the elephant ivory trade in Canada. The responses to the consultation will determine whether or not Canada moves ahead with a ban.
Please go to the link Paul provided to sign and share. Asian and African #elephants are on the critically endangered and endangered #IUCN Red List. Please – StandUpForElephants!

Thank you, Paul!
……..
Paul Rodgers Official
Yesterday at 10:41 AM

We have an opportunity to close the legal trade of elephant ivory in Canada but we need your help. The Canadian government has launched a 60-day consultation asking Canadians and the international community to tell them what action they should take.
You can help by going to the link below and signing the global consultation letter.

Anyone can sign-> https://lnkd.in/gEQibJ7Y

Paul Rodgers Stands Up For Elephants

Congratulate Mara Elephant Project 10-year Anniversary!

Join Elephanatics in congratulating our partner, the Mara Elephant Project (MEP) on a decade of operation today, September 12, 2021. In the last decade, MEP focused on teaching, training, and employing Maasai men and women to be first responders to save wildlife and wild spaces. Their commitment has disrupted poaching in the Greater Mara Ecosystem, protected critical forest habitat and ecologically key areas, and kept community’s farms and families safe. Elephanatics’ support has helped increase MEP’s impact and allowed them to strengthen, build and grow their decade of success. By working together, we can save wildlife and wild spaces.

Please consider a #donation to @MaraElephantProject to celebrate their 10 years of success.

#MEPKumiAnniversary

World Elephant Day 2021

Happy #WorldElephantDay! 2021
The wondrous world and existence of elephants is trumpeted today!
World Elephant Day has highlighted our coalition’s #IvoryFreeCanada campaign and consultation brought forth by the Canadian government to ban the trade of elephant ivory in Canada.
Please read the article below. #Donate to your favourite elephant organization and be sure to take in all the ‘elevents’ found on World Elephant Day website.
Mara Elephant Project is our elephant organization of choice to donate to.

O Canada, We Stand to Ban Ivory

Everyone Urged To Speak Up For Elephants In Global Public Consultation

PUBLIC CONSULTATION  – The Canadian federal government has launched a public consultation to hear feedback on proposed measures to restrict or end the elephant ivory trade!

Everyone is urged to participate in the consultation to provide government feedback.  Please take action by sending in pre-written letter here.

VANCOUVER (July 23rd, 2021) – Elephanatics and the Ivory-Free Canada Coalition (Humane Society International, Jane Goodall Institute of Canada, Elephant and Rhino Defenders, World Elephant Day) are pleased to hear that the Canadian federal government has launched a public consultation to hear feedback on proposed measures to restrict or end elephant ivory trade.

The Ivory-Free Canada coalition along with William Shatner, Bryan Adams, Robert Bateman, and other notable Canadians are calling for a ban on the elephant ivory trade in Canada.

In the past century, the African elephant population, which is currently listed as critically endangered/endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, has declined by 96%, with leading scientists warning the population could be lost altogether within the next few decades in the absence of global intervention to disincentivize poachers.

A Canadian petition launched by the coalition has garnered 636,180 signatures asking the Canadian government to end the legal trade of elephant ivory in Canada.

Every year, as many as 35,000 elephants die at the hands of elephant ivory poachers in Africa. The African elephant population has declined by a staggering 96 percent in the last century, and African elephants are at risk of becoming extinct within a couple of decades. In March of 2021, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) updated the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and declared the African forest elephant to be Critically Endangered and the African savanna elephant to be Endangered. Africa’s biodiversity is already threatened, and further loss of elephant populations will have devastating consequences.

The decline of African elephants is largely driven by poaching, motivated by demand for ivory. Accordingly, a Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) resolution calls on the world community to shut down legal domestic ivory markets “as a matter of urgency”. This resolution mirrors the position of The African Elephant Coalition, which represents 78 percent of African elephant range States, as well as the position of an IUCN resolution on the closure of domestic ivory markets. Canada’s top trading partners, including the United States, China, and the United Kingdom have taken action in response.

Fran Duthie, President and Founder of Elephanatics, stated: “Tens of thousands of African elephants are killed every year to fill the global demand for elephant ivory. The world community is taking action, and more than 630,000 people have signed a petition calling on the Canadian government to ban elephant ivory trade as a matter of urgency. We encourage all Canadians to take part in the consultation and make their voices heard for African elephants.”

Robert Bateman, renowned Canadian artist and conservationist, stated: “The survival of African elephants hinges on the actions of the global community, and progressive nations like Canada have a responsibility to act accordingly. I am joining countless Canadians in calling on the Canadian government to act now and ban elephant ivory trade. I commend the government for launching a public consultation and encourage all concerned Canadians to take this critically important opportunity to speak up.”

Michael Bernard, deputy director of Humane Society International/Canada, stated: “Canada is at a crossroads and the actions we take now to protect African elephants will be remembered for generations to come. In keeping with its commitments to preserve global biodiversity and end human-induced extinctions, the Canadian government has launched a crucial public consultation. We urge all Canadians to participate and make clear that only a robust national ban on elephant ivory trade can truly help us end the senseless killing of African elephants.”

Quick Facts

  • Studies indicate between 25,000 and 50,000 African elephants have been poached annually in recent decades, and even the lowest estimate exceeds the elephant birth rate, thereby posing a direct threat to these populations.
  • In March of 2021, the International Union for Conservation of Nature updated the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and declared the African forest elephant to be Critically Endangered and the African savanna elephant to be Endangered.
  • In 2016, delegates to the 17thmeeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) agreed in a resolution recommending that, “all Parties and non-Parties in whose jurisdiction there is a legal domestic market for ivory that is contributing to poaching or illegal trade, take all necessary legislative, regulatory and enforcement measures to close their domestic markets for commercial trade in raw and worked ivory as a matter of urgency.” Repeated government seizures of elephant ivory in Canada are irrefutable evidence of illegal ivory trade in this nation and likely represent a fraction of existing illegal trade.
  • The African Elephant Coalition, comprised of 32 African nations (including 29 elephant range states) states, “any supply of ivory, including that within otherwise legal domestic markets, inherently increases the risk to elephant populations and local communities, due to the opportunity it creates for the laundering of illegal ivory under the guise of legality.”
  • Canada’s top trading partners, including the United States, China and the United Kingdom have closed their elephant ivory markets in response to declining elephant populations.
  • In addition to elephant ivory trade, Canada allows the import of elephant tusks and parts from trophy hunts. Approximately 300 African elephant tusks – representing 150 elephants – were legally imported into Canada from 2010-2018.
  • 94% of Canadians support an elephant ivory trade ban (Insights West, 2020) and a public petition calling for a Canadian ban on elephant ivory trade has amassed over 600,000 signatures.
  • Canada recently backed the G7 2030 Nature Compact to stop and reverse biodiversity loss, specifically pledging to “meet targets to increase the abundance of species populations worldwide, significantly reduce overall species extinction risk and eventually stop human-induced extinctions”.

More information regarding the Open Letter can be found here.

For interview requests, please call or email media contact below.

Media Contact

Tessa Vanderkop – Vice President, Elephanatics t. 604 789-8886 e. elephanaticsinfo@gmail.com

 

Donations to Asian Elephants!

Captive elephants in Asia are still suffering from a lack of tourists and food. Elephanatics today donated $1500 in total to WFFT Elephant Refuge – Thailand and Friends of the Asian Elephant Foundation
WFFT has 25 elephants so their food costs are very high. FAE built the world’s first elephant hospital and is also the permanent home of Mosha and Boonmee, 2 landmine victim elephants.
We are so happy to be able to help these deserving creatures!
May be an image of outdoorsMay be an image of animal

Elephanatics Newsletter – July 2021

Summer is finally here in Vancouver, BC! We hope you are out enjoying the birds and the bees – and, of course, the elephants, depending on where you live!

 

 

Ivory-Free Canada Petition Update
Since our last newsletter, our petition has gained close to 11,000 more signatures! Thanks to all of you who helped make this possible. We appreciate your support and ask that you continue to share our petition and write your MPs to ask the government to ban the elephant ivory trade in Canada. Positive talks continue between our Ivory-Free Canada coalition and the Minister of Environment. Let’s get this done. Change.org/IvoryFreeCanada
Education Update
May 22 was BiodiversityDay. We were fortunate to have two grade 10 students from FleetwoodParkSecondary School deliver our Biodiversity Presentation to their fellow classmates. We thank Rasudev and Clement for doing a superb job at bringing awareness to the critical role elephants play in supporting their ecological habitats and maintaining biodiversity.

As they presented to students in a math class, they created an equation to calculate the weight of an elephant: Weight = -1010 + 0.036 (L x G), where L is the body length and G is the chest girth.

We thank them again for their volunteer support and love of elephants! Please watch their presentation here.

The BackyardBio 2021 event that ran for the month of May, building up to the International Day of Biodiversity on May 22, was a total success! Elephanatics was pleased to play a big part in promoting the event to school districts in Vancouver and around the world by creating this flyer. So many wonderful connections were built between schools across the globe and students can’t wait for next year to do it all over again!

Check out the results here.

We have created a teacher survey for educators who use our education lesson plans! “Elephanatics’ Teacher Survey: Please take a minute to let us know how you are using our lessons/resources and what resources you’d like to see. Survey participants are eligible for a monthly drawing for Elephanatics swag.” Watch for more interesting lesson plans to be added shortly!

Update: Canadian Corp Drilling for Oil in Africa
ReconAfrica is a Canadian company currently drilling for oil and gas in an area of over 35,000 square kilometres in Namibia. The drill site is near the Okavango Delta – a vast river delta watershed and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is one of Africa’s last great natural sanctuaries. It’s home to much wildlife, including hippos, elephants, crocodiles, lions, leopards, giraffes, and rhinos.

We are greatly concerned about the ecological, environmental, and human rights issues being infringed upon. We know the Namibian drill site overlaps an elephant migration corridor between two national parks. On top of this, ReconAfrica will carry out a seismic survey at a second site in Botswana, on the other side of the migration route.

Biologists say the seismic survey’s sound waves might negatively affect elephants, which communicate via low-frequency seismic waves “heard” through their sensitive feet.

ReconAfrica’s headquarters were in Vancouver, BC, Canada, but have since moved to Alberta, Canada. Elephanatics is supporting international efforts to curtail the drilling by bringing awareness to the issue. You can read more about the drilling from The Guardian here.

Please read the Elephanatics letter to the Canadian government about ReconAfrica here.

DID YOU KNOW?
There are 14 elephants on the move in China! The group left a wildlife reserve in the southwest of Yunnan province more than a year ago and has trekked 500 kilometres (300 miles) north to the outskirts of the provincial capital of Kunming.

Perhaps they are staging their own march in protest against habitat loss, poaching and unethical treatment? What do you think?

Watch video below for some endearing moments as they travel.

Don’t forget to check out Elephanatics’ online shop for clothing items and a variety of other goods for summer, b-days, baby showers, Xmas presents, or any occasion! 100% of the profit of your purchase goes directly to saving elephants.

https://teespring.com/stores/elephanatics-bc

Thank you for taking the time to read our newsletter. Stay safe until next time.

The Elephanatics Team

Copyright © 2021 Elephanatics, All rights reserved.

Rewilding

What is Rewilding?

Rewilding, or re-wilding, activities are conservation efforts aimed at restoring and protecting natural processes and wilderness areas. This may include providing connectivity between such areas and protecting or reintroducing apex predators and keystone species.

Conservation work by Elephanatics’ Dr. Rene Beyers, Director, African Elephant Specialist:

Abstract from Guiding Principles for Rewilding:

Rewilding as an approach to large landscape restoration has been gaining substantial traction. We describe it as the process of restoring native ecosystems, following major human disturbance, to create a complete food web at all trophic levels as a sustainable and resilient ecosystem using biota that would have been present had the disturbance not occurred. Rewilding can be seen on a continuum of ecological restoration towards increased ecosystem integrity and autonomy and reduced human impact and intervention. It is complementary to other conservation approaches, such as protection and community conservation, which so far have failed to stop the continuous decline of species and degradation of nature. Rewilding has an important social dimension, engaging communities in the restoration of “wild” nature and providing hope for healthier ecosystems. The IUCN CEM Task Force on Rewilding consults with a broad community of experts and practitioners and aims to provide IUCN with a clear understanding of rewilding and a link to CEM priority areas. So far, the task force conducted a systematic review of the literature, developed initial guiding principles and performed a survey of rewilding pioneers. Two workshops in the US and Europe were held with academics, advocates, and rewilding practitioners. The workshops highlighted similarities and differences between the two continents in the ecological and human aspects of rewilding. A set of principles emerged as part of an ongoing development.

Continue reading more in link – Guiding Principles for Rewilding

Exploring Restoration, Rewilding, and Human Health

©2021 IUCN, International Union for Conservation of Nature


View full screen – Presentation Slides

Angela Andrade*, IUCN CEM Chair – Rene Beyers, Research Associate, Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia (Canada) – Stephen Carver, Senior Lecturer, School of Geography, University of Leeds; Co-chair, IUCN CEM Rewilding Thematic Group (UK) – Ian Convery, Professor of Environment and Society, University of Cumbria; Co-chair, IUCN CEM Rewilding Thematic Group (UK) – Adam Eagle, Chief Executive Officer, The LifescapeProject (UK) – Angie Luis, Professor of Disease Ecology, University of Montana (USA) –
Laurie B. Marczak, Scientific Publications Manager, Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington (USA) – Cara R. Nelson, Professor of Restoration Ecology, University of Montana; Chair, IUCN CEM Ecosystem Restoration Thematic Group (USA) – Darrell Smith, Lecturer, Centre for National Parks& Protected Areas, Department of Science, Natural Resources & Outdoor Studies (UK) – Céline Surette, Professor, Faculty of Sciences, Université de Moncton (Canada) – Gerardo Suzan, Professor, Departamento de Etología y Fauna Silvestre, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico) – Liette Vasseur, Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Brock University; Vice-chair, IUCN CEM North America and Chair, IUCN CEM Ecosystem Governance Thematic Group (Canada) – Carlos Zambrana-Torrelio, Associate Vice President for Conservation and Health, EcoHealthAlliance; Chair, IUCN CEM Ecosystem Management & Human Health (Bolivia/USA)

June 2020

**
Ecosystem Restoration leaders launch important publication | IUCN
The IUCN CEM Ecosystem Restoration Thematic Group monthly webinar series, “Ecosystem Restoration: Global Initiatives in Science and Practice” provides a forum for IUCN and CEM members to learn about ecological restoration.

Commission on Ecosystem Management – Ecosystem Restoration Webinars

 

ReconAfrica: Elephanatics Letter to Canadian Government

 

ReconAfrica is a Canadian oil and gas company with rights to drill for oil in Namibia and Botswana. It is proven that the exploration of petroleum has routinely been accompanied by ecological harm, and has often been the pretext for conflicts. The exploration area in Namibia and Botswana borders three national parks, the Okavango River, and the Okavango Panhandle, which supplies water to the unique Okavango Delta, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Read our letter to the Canadian government here: https://bit.ly/3pVh63M

Schindlers Eco Forensics: Letter to Canadian Government: ReconAfrica

https://schindlersforensics.ai/eco-forensics-letter-to-the-canadian-government-in-re-reconafrica-kavango-oil-exploration/

…… Dear Sirs/Mesdames,

RE: RECONAFRICA PETROLEUM EXPLORATION ACTIVITIES IN PEL NO. 73 KAVANGO BASIN, NAMIBIA

  1. The above matter refers.
  2. We, as Schindlers Attorneys, a law firm based in Johannesburg, South Africa, and Schindlers EcoForensics (“Schindlers”) a registered interested and affected party (“IAP”) for the above matter, address this letter in our capacity as such with regard to the Environmental Impact Assessment (“EIA”) for the petroleum exploration activities conducted by ReconAfrica in Pel No. 73 Kavango Basin, Namibia (“the Project”). An email confirming Schindlers’ registration as an IAP is attached hereto, marked as Annexure “A”.
  1. This letter is intended to convey our concerns regarding Reconnaissance Energy Africa Ltd (“ReconAfrica”),1 specifically whether ReconAfrica have successfully complied with all the statutory requirements in terms of the Namibian Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations (“EIA Regulations”) as well as the provisions of the Namibian Environmental Management Act (“EMA”),2 insofar as same relate to the Project. A letter containing Schindlers’ comments and submissions in relation to the above is attached hereto, marked as Annexure “B”.
  2. Furthermore, this letter addresses our concerns over the actions of a Canadian-registered company which is clearly violating international agreements to which Canada is a signatory.
  3. If the Project is allowed to proceed, the proposed activities will have devastating effects on global climate change and the ecosystem within the proposed drilling site, further infringing both the human and socio-economic rights of the local and indigenous peoples of Namibia……….

Read the full letter in link above.